Culture

And another Daily Post challenge, but this time it’s a photo! A picture to define culture… Hmm… I have one of those. Taken back home in Cornwall a couple of years ago, this one portrays the great British pub culture, and the age-old conviction that our watering holes are no place for our offspring.

The unfortunate juxtaposition of the dog’s water bowl and the word of warning for thirsty parents outside this pub door was too tempting for words, and I couldn’t resist capturing the moment with Candide Canon. So go to the pub for a shot of British culture, by all means – this establishment kindly provides a bowl of water outside so that our kiddies don’t get thirsty while we’re getting drunk inside. Now that’s what I call good, British decency.

They can't come in, but feel free to leave them outside the pub door.  Copyright: Multifariousmeanderings.

They can’t come in, but feel free to leave them outside the pub door.
Copyright: Β Multifarious meanderings.

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33 thoughts on “Culture

  1. You are supposed to leave the kiddies unattended in the car with a packet of greasy, salty crisps and a sugary, tooth-rotting fizzy drink. What’s wrong with that?

    • That’s what is surprising: you see more dogs in pubs than you do kids. I love the idea of Smelly Dog propped up at the bar with a pint of Bishop’s Finger and a packet of pork scratchings:-)
      In France you can take you children with you to bars, so I’m always disappointed in the UK – I wanted to take them into this pub for a soft drink in the morning, and we were told to sit outside.

    • Pubs are a great place for kids over a Sunday lunch, or during a quiet moment in the day…. Mine would probably be up to tasting the beer too, and in BigFoot’s case, he’d empty a pint but wouldn’t pay for it himself πŸ™‚

  2. Always such a welcoming sign that one, isn’t it?! Pubs offer such good food now, it’s a shame if you can’t take the kids in. Although, I guess it does work out cheaper if you have to leave them outside…

    • Are puns taking the “Great” out of Britain? I can remember being farmed into a hriible “family” room so that my kids wouldn’t be near the nasty people drinking alcohol (shame on you, booooo). I told the pub landlord that my kids saw thir parents drinking at home, but it didn’t work… So we all go outside for a drink, then go home for lunch. Problem solved, and less money for the pub.

  3. I thought this had ended in the UK. I’m sure my daughter went in all the pubs we frequented (which wasn’t many). I once asked if I could take my daughter into a restaurant in the evening and was told “yes, as long as she’s cute”, which put me off going, even though she was very cute. As she was used to eating with us , she never ran around or made a fuss.

    • Maybe my region needs longer to catch up with modernity – it takes a while for the vibes to filter down from the capital πŸ˜‰ “As long as she’s cute”??? I would have grafted a second head on the kid with one eye in the middle. Cheeky ratbag. My kids have always behaved too; sadly, I think that the pub owners are more worried about children being shocked by the behaviour of the adults. Which is a whole new subjects: do adults need to get plastered at the pub to have a good evening?

  4. I always think it’s a shame if the kids can’t accompany the adults. Unfortunately, a lot of adults would rather not have the kids with them and a lot of those same adults, once a little inebriated, probably behave in a way you wouldn’t want the kids to witness! πŸ˜‰

    • I think it should be possible to give times that kids can and can’t be present in pubs – although I reckon parents are big enough and ugly enough to know that evening pub company is inappropriate for children, there are parents like a certain DC from London who don’t know how to look after them and forget them on the bar stool πŸ˜‰

      • Well exactly! You’d think landlords/ladies would be happy for the extra custom and you’re right, most parents would avoid evening pubbing! πŸ˜‰

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